You are attempting to open a file that was created in an earlier version of Microsoft Office. This file type is blocked from opening in this version by your registry policy setting.

You are attempting to open a file that was created in an earlier version of Microsoft Office. This file type is blocked from opening in this version by your registry policy setting

Disclaimer: All care No Responsibility. you follow the instructions provided at your own risk. I take no responsibility any damage you may cause. Please read the article in full before starting

You are attempting to open a file that was created in an earlier version of Microsoft Office. This file type is blocked from opening in this version by your registry policy setting.
long enough error message eh. I originally thought it was a group policy thing but its just a security ‘feature’ installed with the latest office service pack.

error

from an IT perspective, it was easier for me just to fix the file and send it back to the user (IE saved in a newer version, 2003 in this case) so the simple solution was to regedit this in (From KB922849)

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice11.0CommonOICEExemptions]

"ExemptDirectory"="c:\"

note the key (folder) and string needed to be created.

which creates an “exempt directory” for these files, for ease I just did it to my c: although any folder is suitable, and no it doesn’t recurse so you cant make your entire drive exempt like that, copy the file to this location (so in my case its “c:broken.doc”) open, then Save as with Word 2003.

According to KB938810

the steps are as follows for 2003,

To enable Office 2003 to open files that are saved in previous Word file formats, follow these steps:

1.    Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
2.    Locate and then click one of the following registry subkeys:
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftOffice11.0 WordSecurityFileOpenBlock

HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice11.0WordSecurityFileOpenBlock

3.    Double-click the FilesBeforeVersion registry entry, type 0 in the Value data box, and then click OK.

Only I didn’t have these key’s so went with the other option and it worked fine.

Hopefully one of these solutions will work for you

Changing the product/serial key in Office 2007

Disclaimer: All care No Responsibility. you follow the instructions provided at your own risk. I take no responsibility any damage you may cause. Please read the article in full before starting

To change the product / serial key in office 2007 is easy

open regedit

(Start -> Run -> “regedit” (no quotes) -> OK)

Browse to

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftOffice12.0Registration{a very long number}

in there you will find two keys

DigitalProductID
ProductID

office2007serialchange.png

Make sure all your office applications are closed and rename these keys, eg

old.DigitalProductID
old.ProductID

Start office and you will be prompted to re-enter your key. press OK and it will ask you to ‘Install Now’ its quick and painless and your done.

if it all borks up, delete the re-created keys and rename your old. keys back to their original names.

Microsoft Outlook Attachment Storage

Working on documents ‘out of their email’ which is possibly the most dangerous method of working with documents. The problem with this is that files are stored in a hidden temp folder, and it’s very easy to accidentally overwrite the file, it is only a temp folder of course. in fact. the exact* location is

C:Documents and Settings%username%Local SettingsTemporary Internet FilesOLKXX …..SORTOF

as well as this folder being hidden on several levels Microsoft randomize the folder name as an extra step of security to hide these files from users and other security reasons. The last bunch of characters could be anything. (some examples OLK6, OLK8F, OLK3SM etc) You can find this exact folder out by opening up regedit and going to:

HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOfficeXX.0OutlookSecurity XX = 9 for Office 2000, 11 for Office 2003

etc also of course replace %username% with the username. That registry location has always been a hassle to find for me, thats why I am writing this article, throwing in enough keywords to hopefull y bring this article up for other people with the problem of having to get into this folder. Why, exactly WOULD you want to get into this folder? well, one limitation in O2K and O2K3 is the ability to rename duplicate filenames in this folder. lets say you have a scanner or another user sending you the same attachment continuously, it might be ‘image1.pdf’ after a while, you wont be able to open this attachment anymore because outlook adds a number to the filename from 1 to 99, but past 99 it cant handle and you need to get into this folder to delete (or move) the image1(1).pdf image1(2).pdf image1(3).pdf image1(4).pdf ~ image1(99).pdf why else? perhaps you (or your user) has inadvertently been working on a document opened out of email, closed it and saved it but don’t know where it is anymore, because it’s saved it in this hidden folder. Can you change this? no, not as far as I can see. I changed it and it didnt save attachments where I told it to, seems to be there informational purposes only. Another note, if you are doing this remotely (which you can easily do) Remote registry access the users computer, hopefully only one user has been using it and you can find this folder under the first S_1_18_1_20_NUMBERSTOAFRICA folder, there is two per user, it’s the first one you want. if you want to make sure you have the right folder, you can look in

HKEY_USERSS-1-5-21-18030245246-1264929856-123457687-7181Software MicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionExplorerShell Folders

it will have the username several times.

MS KB 296115